Japanese girls braces

Duration: 12min 30sec Views: 671 Submitted: 30.10.2020
Category: Public
Orthodontist Yuki Miyajima believes that Japanese have long been too tolerant of the sometimes crooked ways of teeth. The good news? He says more and more Japanese are seeking out that winning smile achieved by straightening up -- and can improve their health and even English pronunciation by doing so. Miyajima, 39, who calls himself a freelance orthodontist, has written a Japanese book on the subject loosely titled in English: "'Polish' your teeth rather than your English to become cosmopolitan! Dental care for being active globally.

Orthodontist setting Japan straight on teeth

Orthodontist on mission to straighten Japanese teeth | The Japan Times

For a few years now, there has been a craze among young women in Japan for "snaggle teeth" that look a bit like vampire fangs. Not only was she the lead singer of the band AKB48, she also had a yaeba or "double tooth". At the dentist, a yaeba procedure places a ceramic protruding false tooth over a patient's upper canine tooth. Even though Tomomi Itano has now her "extra" tooth removed, young women still seek the yaeba look. She says she didn't feel "kawaii" - which means cute or sweet in Japanese - but she knew yaeba was popular among young women. However, because I hate injections and anaesthetics, I am determined to live with them.

Yaeba dentistry: The appeal of pointy teeth

In many Western countries, crooked teeth are seen as imperfections and most people consider a straight set of pearly whites ideal. The story is slightly different in Japan, where "yaeba," or snaggletooth, are considered cute; with some men finding the imperfect smile they form endearingly childlike and attractive. Okay, so maybe "snaggletooth" is an unfair translation.
To enjoy our content, please include The Japan Times on your ad-blocker's list of approved sites. Orthodontist Yuki Miyajima believes that Japanese have long been too tolerant of the sometimes crooked ways of teeth. The good news? He says more and more Japanese are seeking out that winning smile achieved by straightening up — and can improve their health and even English pronunciation by doing so.